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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
't help them along. they have been squeezed because of a tough environment. there is a big move into tablets and smartphones and all the competition weighs on intel, this type of company. talk about analyst calls. credit suisse cut the target. piper jaffray raised their target just to name a few. but they do have outperforms and neutrals. outperform came from credit suisse. back to you. melissa: nicole, thanks so much. ashley: washington, d.c. prepping for inauguration weekend. if you want a ultimate experience and don't we all, it will cost you a king's ransom. details are ahead. melissa: playing chicken with the energy industry literally. a new fight to shut down oil and wind production to save the prairie chicken. it is a chicken fight. ♪ . melissa: so is the prairie chicken versus the wind farm. the environmental battle heating up as the fish and wildlife service contemplates adding the bird to endangered species list. if that means shutting down vital wind farms and oil and gas facilities is it worth it. i understand the main problem is that these prairie chickens are afr
their parents, their family and others and threatening them. and especially when you are in an environment of uncertainty, people say, well, international community might be leave, the security might deteriorate, so it's easier for these people to be intimidated and switch sides. also impersonation and using uniforms. i see a lot of people here that have been in kabul, and i've met them there. you can easily buy an afghan army uniform or police uniform on the market. you can even buy isaf uniforms if you're looking for it hard in kabul. so that's a part, but also copycat, mentally ill and unstable individuals like in here, sometimes you see what is an increase in the crime because people when they see something, they copy that. they think this is something cool or something acceptable. but, of course, rage and revenge, sometimes these soldiers are personally mistreated. but the last factor, of course s what they call jihad; thinking, of course, this is the right way of action. so so it's a complex phenomena, and i'm not going to go about how to deal with it. if needed, we can talk about it
that is we create a regulatory environment, tax environment, and competitive regime here in this country that actually allows our businesses and workers to win in that global wheat competitive game at the moment. we have some extraordinary assets in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated work force that in many respects outperforms, not out educated about from a point of view workers in virtually every effort country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. our companies have the lowest cost of capital of any companies anywhere around the globe. we have a spirit of entrepreneurship and innovation and capitalist system and commitment to a capitalist system that is the envy of virtually every other country in the world, and we also have increasingly as elude it to in the earlier panel have always had a very strong natural resources, but with shale oil and gas and the incredible strength of our agricultural industry we have a great natural resources as well so there's a lot to be bullish about in this country in terms of our economic opportunities, but this f
senator schumer said there is still a pretty tense environment here in washington and imm after the inaugural ceremonies up here on the platform, they go inside for the traditional inaugural luncheon where the president, speaker boehner and majority harry reid will be sitting down at the same table and wonder what that environment is like. i asked former bush white house chief of staff andy card about that remembering back to 2001 after that controversial election, and what the environment was there, here is what he told me. >> i suspect it will probably be a lot like the atmosphere that george w. bush experienced in his first term of office, it was a little bit chilly and cold, but at the same time, you can't help, but be wrapped up in the excitement of an inauguration. >> reporter: of course, that's what this really is about. celebrating american democracy on monday, tomorrow, the big question, what will the environment be like on tuesday morning, alisyn. >> alisyn: well, that's absolutely right. there is a lot of environment, john. thanks for showcasing that for us and we ca
constrained environment you wouldn't make. >> if i may need to the secretary of the needy or the chief of naval operations is to get more convictions. my mission is to ensure a fair, effective and efficient military justice system and has said, the officers are responsible for the safety, the welfare and the discipline within their command the of difficult leadership decisions to make and they make those decisions case by case, day in and day out and they try to do what's right in each case, not what's easy and what's expedient and not what is a perception of what is expected of that. >> i want to thank you all of the panelists. this concludes the briefing. it's been extremely informative to all of us, and we appreciate not only your service but your participation today. we know that there are veterans out in the back of the audience and we also want to acknowledge their service and commitment and involvement in today's process as members of the audience. i also want to personally thank the commission staff that put this together and highlight who did a spectacular job of putting toget
. it was a big grab bag, $787 billion of goodies that included many things for energy and the environment. i don't recall offhand the overall ratings for energy but i know a lot were included in the economic stimulus bill. host: is president obama making fewer promises that he was initially? guest: absolutely, the 2012 campaign was a campaign of attacks. when we look back at the moments of the campaign, as you look at the debates, what they were sitting on the campaign trail, what they were saying in commercials -- they spent some months of the time attacking each other and relatively little really laying out their agenda in any detail. particularly, mitt romney did not provide any details about his tax plan but even obama spent some much time attacking the romney that there were fewer promises made. there was less of an agenda. host: one last look at theobameter - he has made progress on 73% of his promises. thank you for being here this morning. coming up next is our regular america by the numbers segment where we will look at how american students are performing in schools and how they rank c
a family in the safe and healthy environment. they face threats that once did not exist and we at the capitol have better make sure we are helping them. not hurting them in their efforts. [applause] together we make great strides in the last four years to improve arizona's competitive position. we face the hardest of times but sustain and strengthen state government through the downturn. per capita, arizona has the second number of state employees of all states. [applause] reformed our personnel system they will have a -- motivated by performance and accountable. [applause] we have passed meaningful reform to pass our education system and expand school choice. we limited regulation and enacted the a largest and most tax cut in the state history. unlike our friends in washington, d.c. [applause] and we even accomplished something novel and rare in politics. we kept our word. in 2010, we asked the people to increase their own taxes and promised them it would be temporary. that promise will be kept when proposition 100 sales taxes inpyres in may -- expires in may. [applause] not l
unemployment rate, none of which reflect a good economic environment. our goal is to have economic growth and create jobs. that's what we were elected to do. bill: we've seen in other states, florida for years, texas as well. what you would do is you would tax things that are currently not being taxed by the state, such as certain legal fees, accounting fees, spa services, and food. ultimately what would you get out of it? >> well, you have to look at some serious points. consumption-based sales and use tax very broad based on both goods and service efs is s is a very good economic driver as compared to the negative effect of income taxes which is a detriment to economic growth and jobs. what we believe is to expand the sales tax basin to goods and services, that is something that would absolutely create business activity, and therefore income and gdp growth and with that we were going to get rid of completely the negative taxes, which would be income taxes, both personal and corporate, and what that does is it will create jobs. bill: okay, now we -- i know you believe it's got a pretty g
of educational environment to include vocational training. it's been very successful. >>brian: general, what can the government do? specifically, where would the funds go? >> the funds really, we're not looking for that many public dollars. it only costs $3,500 per veteran per year to put them through this program. we have thousands of wounded warrior programs throughout the country. we think there needs to be a public-private partnership in reintegrating these veterans back into our communities. what we would like to happen is to, for the government to advertise our model and that it be adopted and adapted to the local communities. they figure out with veterans organizations and others on how to make it work inside their communities. we'll work with them very closely. >>brian: do you have a site people can go? >> our chairman governor tom ridge is taupe talk to anyone any time about this program. >>brian: thank you for your service, what you did especially in afghanistan leading that invasion. lieutenant haggenbeck, thank you for joining us. next, if criminals want guns we'll get one.
to keep control. he had to control the environment. he had to control the situation. and that, again, is so similar to madoff. >> sports is filled with cheating and everybody knows it, but there is an aspect of this story that oprah asked lance armstrong which is about in order to cover up, he told a lot of lies. that included emma o'reilly, armstrong's former masseuse. she said lance, quote, tried to make her life a living hell after she went public with some of the details of his doping operation. >> what do you want to say about emma o'reilly? >> hey, she -- she's one of these people that i have to apologize to. >> mm-hmm. >> she's one of these people that got run over, got bullied. >> yeah. isn't she -- you sued her. >> to be honest, oprah, we sued so many people, i'm sure we did. >> you're suing people and you know that they're telling the truth. what is that? >> it's -- it's a major flaw, and it's a guy who expected to get whatever he wanted and to control every outcome. it's inexcusable. and that's -- when i say that there are people that will hear this and will never forgive
are very important to try to create this environment is most appropriate. that is what we are doing. there are potential risks and inflation was mentioned. we have obviously used an expansionary monetary policy and we have increased the amount of reserves that banks hold with the bad. there are some people that think that that will be inflationary. personally i don't see much evidence of that. inflation, as i mentioned, has been quite low. expectations remain anchored. private sector forecasters do not seek any inflation coming up, and in particular, we have, i believe, with all the tools that we need to undo our monetary policy stimulus and to take that away for inflation becomes a problem. so i do not believe that you can inflation is going to be a result of any of us. that being said i stability -- in terms of stability, it is well maintained. the other thing worth mentioning is financial ability. this is a difficult issue. the concern has been raised by keeping interest rates very low that the federal reserve induces people to take greater risks in their financial investments, a
in this environment while it gives you experience and time to get them right? >> good to see you, professor. i think that question goes specifically to the larger question of the problem of principles-based rules. we are present prescriptive in our rulemaking. when we try, if you look at the proposal on general solicitation, when things are more principles-based, what we get back from lawyers, you know, trade groups, please give us a safe harbor with three easy steps and a check lists to ensure ourselves against liability both from the s.e.c. and civilly. there are oftentimes a press to get that sort of prescriptive rulemaking. quite frankly, i'm skeptical it would work because i don't know if folks would take the ball and run with it. the s.e.c., we, the commission, need to get on it and get the rules proposed and finalized. the fact that it's not done is a travesty. the deadline was in july of last year for final rules. and we only got our proposal out at the end of august. i hope and expect that there's a pathway forward. it will depend on which way chairman walter wants to go. >> could you comme
. [video clip] >> we are all products of our experience and environment. i have been tempered by the experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy and military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose in power. no question much of the questioning i have done about iraq and was tempered by the experience in vietnam. whenever i will ever do in my life -- whatever i will do in my life, those experiences shaped me, just like anyone who has gone through war. those experiences shape you very much. it makes you less inclined to jump into war. it is easy to get into war, not very easy to get out, as evidenced by the johnson tapes. you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important, especially in the complicated world we live in today. i think something else is important here and a lesson we learned from vietnam. what is going to be very important for america is not to isolate ourselves in the wo
the japanese planes will be flying again. it is an extremely confusing environment if you have one set of airlines saying they are grounding and another set of airlines saying they are still flying them. >> how disruptive is this for travelers? >> by and large, almost nonexistent. the airlines will swap in some -- jal and ana have canceled some flights, swapped in other aircraft, absolutely minimal. not at the moment an issue of disruption. >> richard quest, thank you. >>> so three months all alone at sea. coming up, we catch up with one of the most determined competitors we have ever met racing around the world all by himself. in a sailboat. ♪ using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it
by a more balanced growth, growth that is more compatible with the sustainability of our environment and the fight against climate change. what does the need for us? i remind you that, in 2013, the imf is stronger, better equipped financially. it has certainly refined some of its tools. we'll continue to strengthen our surveillance, especially on spillover effects and on the financial sector. we will continue to strengthen our support for the entire spectrum of members through lending, capacity building, training and technical assistance. in other words, we're not only serving the needs of a selected group of companies -- a group of countries, but the entire membership. when you look at the world and see where our teams are, where there is building and technical assistance in programs, we are all over the map. and we will continue to push ahead with the important and not complete reform of " and governance. we are in three stages, two are completed. we are certainly short of a few members, one of which is obviously a key member. that is all everyone into open bar conference with. i w
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)